Some Useful Questions On Core Aspects For Job Hunting

job hunting

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If.our resume is not ready to be posted, you may still register with Job.Dom However, only members that post their resume can be found by those recruiters and employers who are hiring. Have one or two other people look at it as well. Strong interpersonal skills: Because the working environment consists of various kinds of personalities and people with different backgrounds, it is essential to possess the skill of communicating and working with people from different walks of life. Look at teaching or being an assistant principal. For more on this topic, see Job-Hunt’s Guide to Successful Job Interviews . You can also seek employment as lifeguards, program coordinators recreation after school, specialists crafts and recreation leaders weekend. If you really dig deep into the company’s background and history, you should be able to figure out why you want to work there long-term. 75% of people said this answer helped them. Tell them what you’re looking for, but let them know you’re flexible and open to suggestions. Expect to get rejected and ignored — until you find your new job.

Huang, from a village in Guangxi and approaching 35, was leaning against a pool table in a public park and drinking a can of beer during a break from job hunting. Wiping sweat from his face with the bottom of his shirt, Huang said he lost his previous job at a Dongguan lamp factory last year when the boss “ran away” a term describing a factory owner who suddenly disappears to avoid debts and salary payments. Although Huang finally received his wages with the help of local authorities, he became one of the migrant unemployed and was desperately searching for a new position returning to his rural home was no longer an option for him as he can’t make a living from the small family plot of land. “I’m deeply worried,” Huang said, adding that it was easier for women to find general, or non-skilled, jobs. He described a jobs vacant post he had seen from a watch manufacturer saying it needed dozens of general workers, but only women aged 18 and 35 would be accepted. “I want to work in an electronics factory,” Huang said. “I don’t have much education, all I can do is manual labor.” For now, Huang pays 300 yuan (HK$350) a month in rent to share a room with another worker, and is desperately in need of cash to cover his monthly expenses of about 2,000 yuan, including food and phone bills. show chapters

China’s manufacturing towns: From boom to bust?

CNBC’s Eunice Yoon reports on China’s once-prosperous industrial zones which are now seeing manufacturing plant closures and vacant factories.

Sunday, 20 Dec 2015 | 11:00 AM ET | 06:20 “If I can’t find a proper job, then I will do whatever I can find, like hourly paid work,” Huang said. “If I don’t work, I won’t have money for food.” The frustrations felt by Huang and many other migrant jobseekers who lack the necessary skills to ride China’s hi-tech wave and are excluded from China’s social security coverage, is the result of the persistent economic slowdown and the redistribution of global production.

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